Diversity in the AFL

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Question

An evaluation of diversity initiatives and management in the Australian Football League. To what extent does the organisation address diversity and provide opportunities for the whole community i.e. people regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, ability, religion, sexual orientation and status as an indigenous person.

Introduction

The Australian Football League (AFL) is the most popularly attended sport in Australia (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2010b). Cultural diversity has proven benefits within the sporting landscape (Taylor 2003) and how the AFL address this is, in some aspects, well ahead of other Australian national sporting organisations (NSO) (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2010a). More indigenous people are involved in Australian rules football than any other sport in Australia (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2010a) and this mass participation from a minority group is an enormous endorsement of the work the AFL have done in this area (Hallinan & Judd 2009).

This paper aims to identify various diversity initiatives within the AFL. The essay will evaluate the extent to which minority groups participate and it will discern between successes and shortcomings of diversity in the AFL. The paper will discuss how the AFL provides opportunities for many minority groups, including the indigenous community, culturally and linguistically diverse (CaLD) demographics, women and the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community (LGBT). Finally this paper will conclude that while the AFL is a leader of diversity in the Australian sporting landscape, there is still much more work to be done. Continue Reading »

Technological shifts have changed the way sport is played. New equipment and apparatus has enhanced sport’s spectacle and facilitated athletes raising the bar in their field. However, as Daniel Elliot’s winter olympic coverage highlights: “When technology completely changes the competition, sports fans and governing organizations start to push back” (2014). This paper will attempt to decipher if technologies have removed the human element in cricket and whether or not this is positive or negative.


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Ben Johnson won the 1988 Seoul Olympics 100m final but was stripped of his title after testing positive to a banned substance, handing the gold to Carl Lewis

Question

 

The Jamaican-born Canadian Ben Johnson is infamously remembered as the 100m sprinter who tested positive at the Seoul Olympics of 1988. Some critics have suggested that the American Carl Lewis, Johnson’s major rival, also tested positive during his career but this was ‘covered up’. In your view, is there a case against Lewis? Investigate and explain why.

 

Introduction

 

The track and field 100m final at the 1988 Seoul Olympics would be dubbed “the dirtiest race in history” (Mackay 2003). Five of the eight competitors would go on to fail drug tests throughout their careers and public opinion of athletes from that period is shaped heavily by the events of one race (Honeyball 2004). Canadian world champion, Ben Johnson, broke the world record with a time of 9.79 seconds and won the race comfortably, defeating his fierce American rival, Carl Lewis (9.79* 2012; Hall & Moore 2012; Honeyball 2004; Mackay 2003). Only days later, Johnson had failed a drug test that would make him the villain of the Olympics and give Lewis, the all-America likeable hero, the gold which many felt he deserved (Hall & Moore 2012). However, in order to remain competitive against a field of cheating athletes, critics have long suspected that Lewis had been using performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) too.

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Australia’s impressive fast bowling stocks were recently ranked on the Roar. There’s no doubting the depth and class in that department. In stark contrast however, batsmanship in the country is at an all-time low. Continue Reading »

We were clearly dominated on day two of the on-going second test. India has outplayed us in every facet of this test match and series thus far. However, I won’t blame our players. It isn’t fair on them. They’re busting a gut out there and doing their best.

What isn’t our best though, is the XI we’ve selected. When does the buck end and will the NSP (National Selection Panel) be forced to take responsibility for their obvious short-comings? Continue Reading »

Dear Mr Inverarity

I’m a cricket fan, a lover of the game and now I’m close to considering myself as a former Australian supporter. I fear there may be more in that very same boat soon, and the responsibility lies with you. Continue Reading »

The Khawaja enigma

Usman Khawaja is touted as Australia’s next man in line and showed why for the Prime Minister’s XI when he built a solid 69 against the touring West Indies. Already this season he is the Sheffield Shield’s fourth leading run-scorer. He has been praised as one of the brightest young batting talents in Australia. He has a classy and sightly technique adapt to combatting tricky conditions and tasted test cricket before. Despite all of this, Khawaja’s ascent to a mainstay in Australia’s middle order appears to hit hurdles at every turn. Continue Reading »